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Friday, 28 Jul 2017

Oxford PV signs Joint Development Agreement with a major industrial partner

The JDA will focus on that path to commercialisation, scaling up the silicon/perovskite tandem PV technology and developing the necessary processes for manufacture

1 Dec 2016 | Editor

Oxford Photovoltaics (Oxford PV) has announced a Joint Development Agreement (JDA) with a global manufacturer of solar cells and modules.

The agreement will see the two companies working together to further develop Oxford PV's perovskite-based solar technology - taking it from lab scale to manufacturing-ready status.

Oxford PV say that hold the world's largest patent portfolio for the use of perovskite in photovoltaic (PV) applications and that its' technology already demonstrates the efficiency and long-term stability needed to move towards commercialisation.

This JDA will focus on that path to commercialisation, scaling up the silicon/perovskite tandem PV technology and developing the necessary processes for manufacture.

The company recently (10th November 2016) announced the acquisition of a pilot line site in Brandenburg an der Havel, Germany. The bulk of this development work will be conducted at that site.

Frank Averdung, CEO of Oxford PV said, "We have made tremendous progress over the last year and this JDA provides independent ratification of our perovskite solar technology and its’ prospects. Whilst our research activities in Oxford focus on the future product roadmap, we are now ready to prepare our technology for commercialisation and will work on this with our partner in the German pilot line."

www.oxfordpv.com   


About Oxford Photovoltaics

Oxford Photovoltaics Ltd (Oxford PV) is a pioneering solar technology company that was founded in 2010 as a spin-off from the University of Oxford by Professor Henry Snaith. Today, the company’s team of 37 people, including chemists and advanced materials scientists are on a fast-track to commercialising a new perovskite-based technology. Last year, Professor Snaith was honoured by Thomson Reuters as the second most influential scientific mind in the world. The company believes that this technology will enable cell manufacturers in the $100bn solar power industry to boost the performance of their solar cells by around 30 per cent and facilitate new multi-billion dollar markets for the generation of solar power.

Source: Oxford Photovoltaics


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